New biotechnology to end malaria: a priority for Norwegian aid?

Arrangør
Bioteknologirådet, BCEPS UiB
Dag
Onsdag 14.8 2024 10:00 - 11:00
Arrangementstype
Debatt
Tema
Helse
Internasjonalt
Språk
English
Sted
Impact Hub Agder Arendal
Vis i kart
Antall plasser i lokalet
70
Streaming
Gå til streamingsiden
Medvirkende
Bjørg Sandkjær, State Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Marianne Aasen, Head of Bioteknologirådet
Ole Frithjof Norheim, Professor and Director of BCEPS UiB
Eirik Mofoss, Executive Director, Senter for langsiktig politikk
Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Special Advisor to the Director General of WHO, University of Pennsylvania/BCEPS
Pakwanja D. Twea, PhD Research Fellow, BCEPS UiB
Lumbwe Chola, Associate Professor, UiO and Ghana NCD Project Lead BCEPS UiB
Eirik Joakim Tranvåg, Senior Advisor, Bioteknologirådet
Mette Risa, Kommunikasjonssjef, Bioteknologirådet
Kontaktperson
Anne Marit Ryen, Bioteknologirådet, 41681490
Nettside
https://www.bioteknologiradet.no/arrangement/new-biotechnology-to-end-malaria-a-priority-for-norwegian-aid/
Universell utforming
Rullestoltilpasset lokale
Rullestoltilpasset WC
Hørselshjelpemidler
Miljøprofil
Ja, vi oppfyller Arendalsukas miljøkrav.
Servering
Ja
Om arrangementet

Mosquito control programs using genetically modified mosquitoes and more efficient malaria vaccines signal a promising trajectory to end malaria. How should these new malaria measures be prioritized? Who should decide – and pay?

The malaria parasite is a significant global threat, with an annual toll of 250 million falling ill and 600,000 dying from the mosquito-borne disease. Djibouti and Uganda are about to initiate mosquito control programs using genetically modified mosquitoes. Additionally, new malaria vaccines being rolled-out in several African countries, including Cameroon and Burkina Faso.

These biotech advancements signal a promising trajectory for global health, with some foreseeing the potential eradication of malaria. However, biotechnology breakthroughs bring new ethical challenges.

Bioteknologirådet and Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health (University of Bergen) invite national and international experts to deliberate Norway's role as a global health actor. Is this Norway's opportunity to lead the charge in malaria eradication, or is Norwegian aid funding best allocated elsewhere?

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